How We Expanded Our Homestead Without Buying Land

 

land revised (1).jpg

As our berry farm has grown, we have been contemplating how we are going to have enough land for proper crop rotation. All strawberry farmers know that long-term success evolves around the ability to rotate crops. We were left with the question, “How can we expand our ground without purchasing land?”

The Problem

Growing conventional strawberries requires proper crop rotation. Strawberries can stay in the same place for a few years, but as time goes on the berries get smaller, risk of disease increases, weeds get thicker, and insect damage increases.

Space is essential to start new strawberry patches and eliminate older ones.

When we started our berry patch, it seemed as though we had enough ground to do everything that we wanted to do, until we realized that we needed to keep our strawberry land separate from much of our vegetable land. You see, strawberries are not friends with many of the vegetables that we enjoy growing…tomatoes, beans, squash, potatoes, etc. They attract the same insects and diseases, therefore, it is best to keep them separated throughout your crop rotation.

We like to grow about an acre of strawberries. With crop rotation, that means we need about four acres of land devoted to strawberries (and cover crop during the rotational years). We already had about an acre planted in blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries. So, in order to continue keeping the quality of strawberries that we wanted, we needed a little more land.

Just purchasing a little more land is quite an obstacle. We really needed something within walking distance from our homestead so we could tend to it on a daily basis while watching the kids. Plus, the risk of theft with specialty crops increases greatly without constant surveillance.

We inquired with a few neighbors to see if they would sell an acre or two, but nobody was interested.

So we started thinking about a different way…

Our Solution

Clearing some pine trees from our own land seemed to be the best option. When our place was first built, this area was intended to be a Christmas tree farm. The trees just grew up and took over the area.

 

A before look from the east

Before clearing the trees, our new strawberries didn’t get quite as much sunshine.

 

Clearing pine trees from the west

After it was cleared, we planted cover crops to help rebuild the soil and reduce the possibility of erosion.

We kept a few pine trees in the front for some landscaping.

 

We also cleaned up the edge of our woods to bring in more sunlight to our existing field. This also gained us several more feet of farmable area.

What We Gained

Clearing our land gave us exactly what we needed. We now have more farmable land in order to handle our strawberry crop plans. Proper crop rotation will help us be sustainable with our berries in the future.

Now we have land exactly where we want it…right within our homestead.

Although we began clearing the trees ourselves, we did decide to hire a crew to clear the land. We felt our time was needed elsewhere continuing to build our business. Using our own tools, this would have taken all year. Hiring a crew with the appropriate equipment was still a substantial savings from purchasing land.

We are excited about all the possibilities we have with our new space. Our chickens have already been busy trying to rebuild the soil.

What was your biggest obstacle when beginning your homestead? Leave your comments below.

 

 

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